Klondike Rush

The Klondike Rush was held here in August, and since it was an anniversary year of the event — 40 years — Paul and the other two men who started the race were honored.  Here are the founders of the Klondike Rush:

Paul Jarvis, Bob Miller and Dave Harness.  All finished the race this day.

Here is a great write-up about the race from the YMCA website:

The Klondike Rush is the oldest running 10K event in Wyoming and surrounding states. Our historic 10K course will get you out into the hills with some good climbs and great scenery as you run to views of the Bighorn Mountains and the sounds of Clear Creek. The popularity of this event continued to grow over the years and led to the addition of the 5k distance. The 5k course is fun and fast for those interested in time, but is also very family and walker friendly. Following the two main events is the FREE Klondike Kids run with three distances depending on age. The Klondike Rush is fun for the whole family!

The name, “Klondike,” comes from the name of the street that the race begins on, in front of the YMCA.  It has become very popular and participants come from around the world.

To commemorate the event, “Whistle-nut and Ole,” rodeo team with trained bull, was present to start the race. When I first saw Ole, I was thinking, “it’s a good thing that ambulance is nearby.”

After some confusion and spinning-around and trouble with a camera, the main event was finally off and running.

Paul did well, especially considering that he hadn’t had a lot of time to train.

It’s always fun to see our friends at the Klondike Rush!  Dave, Dean (always a winner) ,Bob, Paul.  Well done, guys!

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TA Ranch

This week I’m catching up on some of the events that happened here over the summer.  As a Magistrate Judge, Paul had a wedding to officiate at the TA Ranch and invited me to go along.  I didn’t take any photos of the wedding itself, since I didn’t know the couple, but I did want to share some photos of the barn itself.

This was the center of a real-live, old-west shoot-out in 1892.  Their website describes it in this way:

When you escape to the TA Ranch at Buffalo, Wyoming you are surrounded by the history of the old west.   At the crossroads of the Indian wars of the late 1800’s to the trail through the Ranch of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, to the infamous Johnson County Range War of movie fame of “Shane” and “The Virginian,” it’s all here.

1883 TA Barn and Ranch House, occupied by Cattle Baron invaders in the April 1892 three day shoot-out at the Ranch, are today preserved and used on a daily basis by our guests and Ranch hands.

In the cold spring of 1892, a battle pitching homesteading ranchers against the might of the Cattle Barons who had controlled the open range and their hired gunmen in the area reached its peak.  After Baron assassins killed rancher Jones and rancher Tisdale in December 1891 near the Ranch, the Barons and their gunmen set out to eliminate any threat to their control of the Powder River Range by invading the area in April 1892, hunting down and eliminating the homesteading rancher “rustlers” and community public officials and leaders, deemed “rustlers” by such association.

These hunters quickly became the hunted.  An angry posse of hundreds of Johnson County residents/ranchers got wind of the plan and surrounded the invaders at their refuge at the TA Ranch. So began the climactic battle of the famous Johnson County War–a conflict which pitched cowboy and neighbor against the Barons and their gunmen, a western episode that continues to intrigue western historians to this day.  You may have seen filmed versions of the events by the History Channel of American television in recent years, all done at the TA Ranch and its historic properties.

In this photo Paul is looking for the bullet holes left in the barn at the time of the invasion.

They’re not hard to spot.

To get the fully story, though, you need to read about the Johnson County War itself; a great account of it is given here.  The photos are great, too.

We stepped inside the barn and I could imagine what it must have felt like inside this building with a whole town of angry people ready to burn it down.

The wedding was held outdoors and was nice–the bride arrived by horse-drawn wagon, Paul did a great job, the reception and food was nice, and everyone was ready for a good time of celebration at the original site of the 1892 Johnson County Invasion.

 

 

 

Games

We had fun hanging out with our friends in Jackson.  There’s plenty to do, even without wifi or TV.  In this photo we’re playing Left, Right, Center.  My goal was to get rid of all the candy bars I had left over, and the scheme worked for me.  Everyone else won rounds of the game except me.

There’s plenty of time to sit and admire the mountain views.

We took our friends to see the Cunningham cabin, and I couldn’t avoid taking a few “through the window” photos.

We also drove them through the National Park.

Then we returned home and shot some pop cans with a bb gun.  We all found out it isn’t easy to shoot from a moving swing, but it was a lot of fun.

 

 

 

Eclipse

We had a great opportunity to watch the full eclipse of the sun at my dad’s home in Jackson Hole.  Some friends from Kansas–Gretchen and Jim–came to join us, as well as two of our kids.  Thankfully, the weather was great that day.

Paul and Jim set up tripods for their cameras and we watched the entire process with great enthusiasm.  We had free glasses from the library.

We saw the crescent sun in the shadows from a colander we had on hand.

And also in the shadow of the trees.

But the most exciting moment, of course, is when totality arrives and the beautiful horizon lights up in all four directions.

We could clearly see the corona effect.  Then, very soon, it was daylight again and it was cool to see a jet that had apparently come across the Tetons to view the total eclipse turn back to the North.

 

 

Crystal Awards

Today I’m sharing “sign” pics from the Crystal ship Symphony that we enjoyed so much.  First, a safety sign:

Next, the first sign I saw every morning before going out on the deck for a morning walk:

I discovered an interesting room in the ship that displays all the wonderful gifts they have received from each port they have visited around the world.  It’s impressive!

There was also a huge display and blessing provided by the craftsmen of the shipyard in Finland, where Symphony was built in 1995:

Finally, I’ll share a couple more menus from our week at sea: